"China had 632 million Internet users at the end of June, an increase of 14.4 million since the end of December, according to a semiannual report published on Monday by the official China Internet Network Information Center, which is known as CNNIC. Of those, 83.4 percent reported gaining access to the Internet with mobile devices, exceeding for the first time the percentage who reported using computers to go online, at 80.9 percent."

Read more in the New York Times

Internet Finance in China: Will it Disrupt Traditional Banking?

Like many businesses the world over, investment in China has gone mobile. Just ask Yang Ren Jun, a 26-year-old translator and interpreter in Shanghai. Yang initially invested ¥3,000 ($483) in a new online investment service called Yu’e Bao (meaning “leftover treasure” in Chinese) in February this year, following the product’s launch in June of last year. Her husband invested several tens of thousands of renminbi. Yang now uses a mobile app to check the account regularly, eyeing the steady growth of her bundle as the annual interest rate of roughly 5 percent does its work.Read more

Internet Finance in China: Will it Disrupt Traditional Banking?


Like many businesses the world over, investment in China has gone mobile. Just ask Yang Ren Jun, a 26-year-old translator and interpreter in Shanghai. Yang initially invested ¥3,000 ($483) in a new online investment service called Yu’e Bao (meaning “leftover treasure” in Chinese) in February this year, following the product’s launch in June of last year. Her husband invested several tens of thousands of renminbi. Yang now uses a mobile app to check the account regularly, eyeing the steady growth of her bundle as the annual interest rate of roughly 5 percent does its work.

Read more

fastcompany:

These Photos Of Hong Kong Skyscrapers Will Make You Very Dizzy
wnderlst:

Qinghai, China | David Liu

wnderlst:

Qinghai, China | David Liu

Tags: China Qinghai

theworldofchinese:

Khorgos: China’s Newest City 

China’s ancient Silk Road has just witnessed the birth of a new city, Khorgos (霍尔果斯) located in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, reports Xinhua. The city is located on the border of Kazakhstan and China; the Chinese side is known as Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Continue reading here…

chinadigitaltimes:

Another #panda, as requested! Taken at the Panda Breeding Center in #Chengdu, #Sichuan by @viktormugli. Tag your #China photos #cdtimes to share them with us! #熊猫 #成都 #四川 #中国 #中国数字时代

chinadigitaltimes:

Another #panda, as requested! Taken at the Panda Breeding Center in #Chengdu, #Sichuan by @viktormugli. Tag your #China photos #cdtimes to share them with us! #熊猫 #成都 #四川 #中国 #中国数字时代

Tags: china pandas

"As the [cap-and-trade] coverage expands, these China-based factories will be covered under the obligation for emission reductions. And given the significant trade ties between China and the US, the incremental carbon costs—in various forms—would eventually be passed through to the downstream players and end-users in the US."

Bloomberg analyst Charlie Cao on how China’s cap-and-trade plan will affect foreign manufacturers in China.


Popularly known as cap-and-trade, ETSs involve setting a “cap” on permits to engage in carbon pollution, which are then traded publicly and must be turned in by polluters at the end of a given period. In China’s 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), the Chinese government mandated the establishment of seven regional ETSs in the cities of Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Chongqing, as well as the provinces of Guangdong and Hubei. Most of the ETS exchanges came online over the course of late 2013 and early 2014, with the final market coming into effect in Chongqing on June 19 of this year.

Read more in the China Business Review

Popularly known as cap-and-trade, ETSs involve setting a “cap” on permits to engage in carbon pollution, which are then traded publicly and must be turned in by polluters at the end of a given period. In China’s 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15), the Chinese government mandated the establishment of seven regional ETSs in the cities of Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Chongqing, as well as the provinces of Guangdong and Hubei. Most of the ETS exchanges came online over the course of late 2013 and early 2014, with the final market coming into effect in Chongqing on June 19 of this year.

Read more in the China Business Review

theworldofchinese:

Get Your Claws Into Xialongbao (with recipe!)

There is no feeling quite like picking up a fresh dumpling on the verge of bursting out of its semi-transluscent skin and nibbling a small hole in the skin to suck out the devilishly good filling: orgasmic. And while it’s a big wide world of dumplings out there, the crabby goodness of 小笼包 (xiǎolóngbāo) is surely king in the dumpling stakes.

Literally “small steaming basket buns”, xiǎolóngbāo is not your average dumpling. This type of bun bears the typical characteristics of Jiangnan (immediate south of the lower reaches of Yangtze River) cuisine, boasting intricate folds, a delicate size, the softest yet juicy texture, and an incredible explosion of salacious flavors. Whether it’s pork, bamboo shoots, or shrimp, the filling is always minced to ensure softness and saturation, epitomizing the Jiangnan taste.

Continue reading here…